Jarom

Nephite prophet

❮ Back

Jarom

Jarom, son of Enos, continued the process of record-keeping on the small places of Nephi from around 420 BC to 361 BC. His contribution is brief, comprising the shortest book in the Book of Mormon. He declines to include his own personal words of inspiration. “And as these plates are small, and as these things are written for the intent of the benefit of our brethren the Lamanites, wherefore, it must needs be that I write a little; but I shall not write the things of my prophesying, nor of my revelations. For what could I write more than my fathers have written? For have not they revealed the plan of salvation? I say unto you, Yea; and this sufficeth me”. Jarom describes the prevailing tendency among many of his countrymen.

Behold, it is expedient that much should be done among this people, because of the hardness of their hearts, and the deafness of their ears, and the blindness of their minds, and the stiffness of their necks; nevertheless, God is exceedingly merciful unto them, and has not as yet swept them off from the face of the land.

In his few verses, Jarom offers insights concerning the work of the Lord during his time. “And there are many among us who have many revelations, for they are not all stiffnecked. And as many as are not stiffnecked and have faith, have communion with the Holy Spirit, which maketh manifest unto the children of men, according to their faith”. The kings and leaders of his day, being “mighty men in the faith of the Lord” , were effective in defending the people against the incursions of the Lamanites. The prophets of God were active in helping the people ward off pride in times of great prosperity, reminding them constantly “to look forward unto the Messiah, and believe in him to come as though he already was... for they did prick their hearts with the word, continually stirring them up unto repentance”. Before delivering the plates into the hands of his son, Omni, Jarom counseled his readers that they could go to the larger plates of Nephi if they wanted additional details concerning the broader history of the people and their wars.

(Source: Ed J. Pinegar, Richard J. Allen, Book of Mormon Who’s Who)

❮ Back