strtoupper('“B')enjamin His Son, Reigneth in His Stead”

In the Book of Mormon story, we encounter a king named "Benjamin" (Omni 1:23), who would rule over both the Nephites (descendants of Ephraim and Manasseh) and the Mulekites (descendants of Judah), and led his people into "a serious war" against the Lamanites (Omni 1:24).

It is interesting that in ancient Israel, the tribe of Benjamin occupied a strip of land between the tribe of Judah and the tribes of Ephraim and Manasseh. Under the Divided Monarchy, "Ephraim" (the Northern kingdom) occupied part of the lands of Benjamin, while "Judah" occupied the rest of the land. However, the tribe of Benjamin remained part of the kingdom of Judah (1 Kings 12:19-24). The tribe of Benjamin earned a high reputation for bravery and skill in war. [Tyndale House, The Illustrated Bible Dictionary, Vol. 1, p. 185]

Does the historical significance of the name "Benjamin" in Old Testament times have anything to do with king Benjamin in the Book of Mormon? Perhaps the name "Benjamin" and the role the character plays in the Book of Mormon is a coincidence; perhaps there was foreknowledge and expectation of Benjamin's accomplishments by his father Mosiah1; or perhaps this is an example of Metonymic naming (after-the fact editorial naming) by Mormon. [Alan C. Miner, Personal Notes] [See the commentary on Metonymic naming in 1 Nephi 3:3]

Omni 1:23 Benjamin ([Illustration]): The land occupied by the tribe of Benjamin. [Tyndale House, The Illustrated Bible Dictionary, Vol. 1, p. 185]

“Benjamin, Reigneth in His Father's Stead”

In the Book of Mormon story, we encounter a king named "Benjamin" (Omni 1:23), who would rule over both the Nephites (descendants of Ephraim and Manasseh) and the Mulekites (descendants of Judah), and led his people into "a serious war" against the Lamanites (Omni 1:24).

It is interesting that in ancient Israel, the tribe of Benjamin occupied a strip of land between the tribe of Judah and the tribes of Ephraim and Manasseh. Under the Divided Monarchy, "Ephraim" (the Northern kingdom) occupied part of the lands of Benjamin, while "Judah" occupied the rest of the land. However, the tribe of Benjamin remained part of the kingdom of Judah (1 Kings 12:19-24). The tribe of Benjamin earned a high reputation for bravery and skill in war. [Tyndale House, The Illustrated Bible Dictionary, Vol. 1, p. 185]

Does the historical significance of the name "Benjamin" in Old Testament times have anything to do with king Benjamin in the Book of Mormon? Perhaps the name "Benjamin" and the role the character plays in the Book of Mormon is a coincidence; perhaps there was foreknowledge and expectation of Benjamin's accomplishments by his father Mosiah1; or perhaps this is an example of Metonymic naming (after-the fact editorial naming) by Mormon. [Alan C. Miner, Personal Notes] [See the commentary on Metonymic naming in 1 Nephi 3:3]

Omni 1:23 Benjamin ([Illustration]): The land occupied by the tribe of Benjamin. [Tyndale House, The Illustrated Bible Dictionary, Vol. 1, p. 185]

Alan C. Miner -

Alan C. Miner

Step by Step Through the Book of Mormon: A Cultural Commentary

References